UAW Local 6000 Retirees

Hello UAW Local 6000 Retiree!

UAW retired members finance their own structure through voluntary retiree dues. These dues make their programs self-supporting. Since the Constitutional Convention in 1966, retirees have pledged that the UAW would not have to use active members’ dues to support the retired workers’ programs. Our retired members have kept faith with that pledge.

Originally, retiree dues were $1 per month. However, in 1986, the retirees went to the Constitution Committee entirely on their own and proposed changing the $1 per month voluntary dues to $2 per month. They explained that the retirees could not achieve their goals or continue to run essential programs on the current $1 per month. The Constitutional change was overwhelmingly approved.  Since that time the dues have gone to $3.00 per month.

Retirees are not required to pay dues, but today 75 percent of the retired members pay the new amount of $3 per month in voluntary dues. Of these dues, 35 percent stays in each local union retired workers chapter, 25 percent goes to the regional retired workers fund and 40 percent of each dollar goes to the UAW Retired Workers Department for their efforts on behalf of retired workers. Some of these efforts would be for collective bargaining, legislation, communication, education and representation on issues affecting seniors and retirees. The entire program of the UAW retired workers’ movement is financed by retirees’ voluntary dues.

Spouses or surviving spouses may request to become associate members of the retired workers chapters. Surviving spouses are also encouraged to participate in the voluntary dues program.

We now have almost as many retired members as active members. Retiree dues support all of the activities of the retired workers’ programs and are now more necessary than ever before.

If you have moved or want to contact the Local just let us know here

As you move forward into the retired life, remember the legacy of achievement you left behind! Thank you for your time, energy, and dedication to Michigan’s citizens and to UAW Local 6000.

UAW retirees are activists in every sense: from community service activities to political campaigns, UAW retirees contribute their time and talents to make a difference. We do have individual priorities, but as retirees, we share the same basic concerns, and will continue to advocate for issues affecting retirees, such as healthcare, prescription drugs, retirement security, pension benefits, Social Security and Medicare. Together, we can ensure that our voice will be heard locally, state-wide, and nationally.

Presently, there are three (3) retiree chapters for the retired members of UAW Local 6000:

Statewide Retired Workers Chapter; meetings are in Lansing
• Region 1-A Retired Workers Chapter; meetings are in Taylor
• Region 1-D Saginaw; meetings are in Saginaw.

 

RETIREE CORNER   
 
“Stay Home,  Stay Safe” – Governor Gretchen Whitmer 

Hello Retirees:

UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE ALL MEETINGS AND ACTIVITIES FOR THE

 UAW LOCAL 6000 RETIRED WORKERS ARE CANCELLED.

Covid-19 exposes America’s devastating Inequalities

September 12, 2020

Retirees, the most critical task before us is to vote in the election
November 3, 2020. Every Vote Counts. All registered voters in
Michigan can vote by mail. For your protection and avoid long
lines, sign up to vote by mail! Submit the request to your 

local election office. You should request your ballot as far in
advance of the election as possible. The deadline to request a
ballot by mail is (received by) Friday, October 30, 2020. Your
request must be received by 5 p.m. the Friday before the
election (October 30, 2020). If you are concerned about mail
delivery, you can hand deliver your ballot to your local city
or township clerk.

The most important issues before older Americans
are currently: Covid-19, financial security (the economy),
civil unrest, health care/drug costs, and climate change.
Racism, education, immigration and terrorism are also
significant as many are concerned about the world our
children and grandchildren will inherit.

The Covid-19 pandemic has not only presented
a serious health threat to all citizens, but caused
serious decline in local, state, national, and global
economies. Jobs have been lost, unemployment
funds for many families have ended, costs for food,
shelter, health care and other essential needs have
increased. Some people have been fortunate to
maintain employment with adjusted options and
are now able to work part-time either from home or
alternate hours at their place of employment. Trump,
in his “infinite wisdom” decided that what workers
need most is a break from paying the payroll tax that
funds Social Security. He has declared a delay in
payroll taxes, beginning in September until the end
of 2020, for workers who “generally” earn less than
$4,000 biweekly or about $100,000 per year. Employees
in this category pay 70% of Social Security funds
currently collected. The current cap is $137,700,
therefore, the wealthy do not pay this payroll tax
beyond the cap.

Actually, the payroll tax cut is really a loan
that workers have to pay back. Beginning in
January, the payroll tax, taken from each
employee, will be doubled until paid in full.
In the opinion of many, this is a thinly veiled
approach to defunding Social Security. There
are current legislators salivating over the
$2.7 trillion currently in the fund. 

Trump has stated, “if reelected he will
extend the cut to beyond the end of the
year and then terminate the tax.” Effectively,
terminating Social Security which so many
older Americans rely on for retirement, and
survivor and disability benefits. In 1980 the
government mandated that retirement benefits
be moved from pensions to 401(k)’s through the
Revenue Act of 1978. That move allowed
corporations to save money and Wall Street access
to trillions of dollars that were previously unreachable
in private corporate pensions. This was a travesty
since stock prices were no longer an indicator of
productivity, but markets were now manipulated by
Wall Street speculation, and most common people had
no experience in playing the market. If Social Security
is allowed to be defunded and the program ends, retirees
and vulnerable citizens will face further adverse, financial
situations. According to some economists, the program
could be depleted as soon as 2023, depending on how fast
legislators dip into what remains in the fund.

Most seniors and disabled worker beneficiaries
 rely on Social Security
 for a majority of their
income. Some State retirees are on the Defined
Benefit program, but since 1997 most employees
are only covered under the Defined Contribution
Program. As the pandemic continues to exact a toll
on the health and financial security of Americans,
and the stock market is so volatile, Social Security’s
guaranteed income is all the more important. We have
to get proactive! Call your Congressman. Tell them to
protect the Social Security program, and, raise the
income cap so that the tax could be lowered for everyone
and still fully fund the program into perpetuity.

Retirees, you have heard this before, but this is
the most important election of our lives! Let your
voice be heard, VOTE!

Sisters and Brothers, coping with the loss of a
close friend or family member may be one of
the hardest challenges that many of us face. 
The sadness typically diminishes in intensity
as time passes, but grieving is an important
process in order to overcome these feelings and
continue to embrace the time you had with your
loved one. Sincere condolences to all who are grieving.

My husband, Rob, who bravely fought a long
battle with leukemia, was called to our heavenly
home last week. I miss him. Cherish your time
with your loved ones.. hug them often!

If you experience a financial hardship and
need assistance please call United Way 211
the helpline is available by phone, text or
live chat 24 hours a day to connect people
with the resources they need in times of
crisis. Other resources you might contact
is your local Commission on Aging and
various churches.

We are in this together, and we will
get through this – together.

                SOLIDARITY!!

 

 

 

July0 2, 2020

Covid-19 has been described as an “equalizer.” Because people from all walks
of life can be infected, regardless of ethnicity, status or wealth.  But with each
day of isolation, we see that the virus isn’t an equalizer at all. Instead, it is
exposing the inequalities that have been present for decades in American society.
This virus has significantly impacted, low-income citizens, people of color,
and others who were already marginalized before the crisis hit.

Many workers were able to work from home, but a majority of the front-line
workers (minimum wage) still had to go to their jobs. Among those in isolation
at home, inequality was still a huge issue, with some able to order food delivery
to their home, but others were forced to go to food banks or public services to
obtain food because they could not afford the cost or delivery fee.

Access to needed assistance for basic needs, adequate medical care, and equality
in society was not always available to all during this crisis, which could be the
product of systemic racism. Systemic racism means that there are 
barriers – including wealth disparities, criminal justice bias, and education
and housing discrimination
– to segments of our society.

Systemic racism specifically impacts African-Americans every day. It has been
most visible in racial profiling and police brutality against the Black community.
Ugly, racial disparities became evident to the world with the brutal death of
George Floyd.

His death triggered subsequent peaceful demonstrations across the world, that
forced our nation to see what the Black community has been forced endure. In my
opinion, the ensuing violence and destruction in the marches was caused by paid,
pro-militia groups. Not the protestors who were seeking justice.

I believe America has woke up. People are seeing more clearly than ever. They want
to understand white privilege, and be able to recognize the bias, prejudice, and
discrimination that they did not see until now. Many people are now looking for
ways to deepen their involvement within anti-racist movements. In the news this
past month, we have learned about past atrocities. I had never heard about Tulsa
Black Wall Street! I did learn about Jim Crow laws in the 1960’s when I lived in
Virginia. I was shocked. I wanted to go with my co-workers to the Freedom
Marches…but they would not let me. They said I was naïve, white and from the
north .. it wasn’t safe for me. Now is the time for us to stand for their safety, for
social justice for our Brothers and Sisters.

This is the time for all those who love America and care deeply about its values
to speak out in the name of justice and against systemic racism. The UAW has
long stood with those fighting for civil rights, justice for all and a society free
from the blight of racism and discrimination. Together, we must stand up and
speak up, against racism and white supremacy.
                                   Black Lives Matter!

  “Injustice for one is injustice for all.” – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Generations of Americans fought and died for our right to vote, the freedom to
choose our leaders, and the right to speak up for our beliefs. But even today,
many eligible voters are wrongly turned away or do not have access to the polls.
We vote because it’s we, the people, who are supposed to shape our government.
Not the other way around. We must take our peaceful protests in the streets to
the ballot box. We must vote out the politicians who protect and empower racists
and white supremacists.   Your Vote Is Your Voice!   

  “Voting is the foundation stone for politicalaction”. – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

We are anxious to get together with members! The volatility of the Covid -19 virus
and the danger of exposure to our retirees, is a deep concern. We have had retirees
who have suffered from this virus, some losing their lives. We also received a
recommendation from the UAW, that it is prudent not to conduct any in- person
meetings or events at this time, so we have made the decision to wait. We are exploring
the possibility of a Zoom meeting. If it is determined that we are able to conduct it,
I will post it on the Facebook pages addressed posted in this article. Stay Safe!!

If you experience a financial hardship and need assistance please call
United Way 211 the
helpline is available by phone, text or live chat 24 hours
a day to connect people with the resources they need in times of crisis.

Other resources you might contact is your local Commission on Aging
and various churches.

Please contact the Office of State Employer (OSE) with any changes
in your status, especially your current address. You may be missing
updates from ORS if your address is not correct. Whenever bulk mailings
are done from Local 6000, (Including: Newsbreak, election ballots or
other notifications) the address list from OSE is used. If your address is
not current you may be missing important notification. Call OSE with
any changes, do not miss any future notifications.

             We are in this together, and we will get through this – together.

First, they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out—because I was
            not a socialist.
Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak out— because
           I was not a trade unionist.
Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—because I was not a Jew.
Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me. — Martin Niemöller

                                                               SOLIDARITY!!


June  11, 2020

I, for one, am grateful for these few warm sunny days we have been given! I love the
fresh sweet smell of the flowers and the trees. Welcome, Summer!!

Covid-19 has presented as a global crisis.  It is an unprecedented situation in our lives
and normal rules no longer apply. Our focus shifts, and what matters shifts. It is a fact
that many individuals experience feelings of boredom and loneliness. They also are
facing some deep emotional challenges from the isolation and grief because they are
unable to visit family and friends, or are unable to give support to loved ones.
As people’s lives are disrupted, isolated and upturned, we must prevent this
pandemic from turning into a crisis of mental health.  There are many resources
for you if you need them.

Then, the dams in Sanford and Edenville caused the “500 year” flood in Mid-Michigan.
Even though many of our Union families suffered great damage and loss to their own
personal property, plus contending with the danger of the Covid-19 pandemic, many
were out assisting in the emergency relocation of their neighbors. Thank you, to
Steve Lamb, UAW Liaison to the Saginaw United Way, for his efforts to organize our
Union Locals and assist in the evacuation, relocation, shelter and cleanup for the flood
victims, plus helped provide food, cleaning products, personal needs, tools and other
necessary items to the flood victims. The UAW values our partnership in our
communities and is usually at the forefront to provide aid.

In times like these, more than ever before, we need solidarity and hope. We have hope
because we have each other, and we will go through this
together.

The officers of UAW Local 6000 Statewide Retired Workers Chapter all agree to
support Governor Whitmer in her endeavor to protect all citizens health and safety
with the Stay Home – Stay Safe order. Statistics show because of the current
restrictions the new cases of Covid-19 are declining. As a cautionary decision though,
she extended her executive order stay-at-home order for many activities until June 12
and the state of emergency until June 19. Slowly, some businesses have recently been
allowed to reopen, including some of the factories. There have been provisions made
to ensure that stricter safety measures will be implemented to protect employees.
Although some critical positions require State employees to be onsite, employees in
several departments have been working at home. Safety practices will be implemented
as they return to the office buildings.

With the warmer weather we all have that urge to get out and enjoy nature.
But authorities warn that we must still practice social distancing. Social distancing
means staying home as much as possible, but if you are in a public area, maintain a
distance at least six feet from another person. Take a walk, work in your yards or
gardens, but remember to be extra cautious during this time. The precautionary
steps you take, like wearing masks, washing your hands and disinfecting surfaces,
will help prevent an infection.

The ugly racial and misogynistic bias and hatred has come to the forefront again.
Hate in America has been encouraged and is now commonplace. I must declare
my astonishment when statistics of the death count from Covid-19 were discussed
on a TV news conference, and I heard some of the politicians utter the statement,
“Well, older people are going to die anyway.” I am deeply offended. Who are they
to say that an 80-year-old wouldn’t have otherwise lived to be 100 and done a lot
of wonderful things in those 20 years? The implication being that only the first
40 years of someone’s life matters. I believe that the last 20 years are just as valuable.
Sisters and Brothers, we must stand up and speak against this prejudice!! Everyone
must make their voice heard! We need to get educated about the candidates and
understand their platforms, get involved in the campaigns and Vote in November!
We ALL matter!

Hopefully, with the country’s attention focused on this pandemic, the inequalities
experienced by the elderly and disadvantaged people during this crisis will bring
a stronger commitment to working toward social justice and health equity. As we
witness the severity of the human toll of this pandemic, it is clear that COVID-19
provides a strong case for Medicare for All and a stronger human justice platform.

You have a right to mail in your ballot for the August and the November election.
Michigan’s primary will be Aug 4, 2020. The General election will be held Nov 3, 2020.
Requests to have an absent voter ballot can be downloaded from the Michigan SOS
website or mailed to you. It must be received by your clerk no later than 5 p.m. the
Friday before the election. A request for an absent voter ballot must be in writing and
can be submitted to your city or township clerk. You have until 8 p.m. on Election Day
to complete the ballot and return it to the clerk’s office. Your ballot will not be
counted unless your signature is on the return envelope and matches your
signature on file
Please be sure to vote!

The 2020 Census has been hindered by the social distancing order. New regulations
allow for completing the form on the phone, by mail or online. Although, the
consensus is that many may be missed. Deadlines may have to be adjusted. If you
have not responded, please take this time to complete the forms. When you respond
to the census, you’ll tell the Census Bureau where you live as of April 1, 2020.

When retirement isn’t all you thought it would be or your retirement
income isn’t cutting it, maybe you have considered going back to work.
 There are many opportunities available for retirees who want to stay
active
. Today’s workplace is trending towards flexible work options.
When you call a hotel for a reservation, an insurance company, or any
company that has a customer service agent, use home- based workers.
Many of these positions are flexible, so you could pick your own hours.
Imagine the jobs we could bring back to the USA! Check the posting sites
for employment on the internet.

We will be adhering to Governor Whitmer’s stay-at-home orders.
The current order expires June 19. If it is determined that we are able
to plan a meeting for July, I will post it on the Facebook pages addressed
posted in this article.

If you experience a financial hardship and need assistance please call
United Way 211 the
helpline is available by phone, text or live chat 24 hours
a day to connect people with the resources they need in times of crisis
.
Other resources you might contact is your local Commission on Aging and
various churches.

We are in this together, and we will get through this – together.

                                                     SOLIDARITY!!

REMINDER: If you have questions about your BCN Advantage benefits,
you are invited to contact Keri Rust,
Insurance Benefits Analyst, @ 1-517-284-0085
or 1- 800-505-5011 and/or Kelsi Sawdy, BC/BS @ 1-517-325-4006

Please contact the Office of State Employer (OSE) with any changes in your status,
especially your current address. You may be missing updates from ORS if your
address is not correct. Whenever bulk mailings are done from Local 6000,
(Including: Newsbreak, election ballots or other notifications) the address list
from OSE is used. If your address is not current you may be missing important
notification. Call OSE with any changes, do not miss any future notifications.

 

 

May 2, 2020
 UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE ALL MEETINGS AND ACTIVITIES FOR THE

 UAW LOCAL 6000 RETIRED WORKERS ARE CANCELLED.

There were prior warnings about Covid-19 pandemic! And yet, America was caught short
on testing abilities, ventilators and personal protective equipment (PPE) for medical staff.

It has caused all Americans extreme fear and confusion: What is it? Where did it come from? 
How can I be safe and protect my family? How long will social distancing last?

Governor, Gretchen Whitmer signed executive order 2020-59, extending her “Stay Home, Stay Safe”
order through May 15, 2020. The new order will require people to wear homemade face coverings
when
they enter enclosed public spaces and also to continue social distancing (6 feet from
another person). It is critical that surgical masks and N95 respirators are reserved for healthcare workers.
The order will also lift some restrictions on outdoor activities and allow some workers who perform
previously suspended activities to go back to work. 

Per the Detroit Metro Times, southeast Michigan has been particularly hard hit. More than 3,200
residents of nursing homes, assisted living centers, and other residential facilities for the elderly
have tested positive for COVID-19 and 700 have died in Wayne, Oakland, and Macomb counties,
according to data obtained by Metro Times. That’s a fatality rate of nearly 22%, which shows how
deadly the coronavirus is among the elderly.(Detroit Metro Times posted By Steve Neavling
 Tue,
Apr 28, 2020 10:06 am)Stats for State of Michigan on 4/20/20 Confirmed cases-41379  
Deaths- 3789 Total Recovered – 8342  per Michigan.gov.

The pandemic has caused abrupt changes in our routines that could have a
huge effect on mental and physical health. Not being able to take a simple walk,
to visit a doctor or to see family members can create stress and anxiety.
Measures such as social distancing, especially from contact with their family,
or restricting nursing home visits, may protect them from contracting the virus,
but it could cause an increased risk for loneliness, depression, malnutrition,
hunger, and other adverse health events.

Isolation and loneliness are already huge health-related problems among
seniors.
The ability to socialize, is “critical” to most retirees. Please stay
connected while staying home!!  It is very important to stay in touch with
friends and family that do not live in your home. Call, video chat, or stay
connected using social media. Everyone reacts differently to stressful
situations and having to socially distance yourself from someone you
love (especially grandchildren) can be difficult! I found that as we have a
warm day (well, once in awhile) just sitting in the sun is refreshing to the soul.

We encourage everyone to think about our neighbors, family or friends to make
sure they are healthy and safe. They might be dealing with health issues or
financial hardships and could use some extra support before stress and anxiety
creates a more dire situation. And, although social distancing is necessary to
help limit the spread of the virus, anything that deters people from accessing group
meals at senior centers or food banks puts some seniors in danger of malnutrition
and hunger. If you, or someone you know experience a financial hardship and need
assistance please call United Way 211 the helpline is available by phone, text or
live chat 24 hours a day to connect people with the resources they need in times of
crisis. Other resources you might contact is your local Commission on Aging and
various churches.

Sisters and Brothers, we can do this! We are all in this together!! We have to rely
on our Medical teams, scientists, our Governor and
her team, and abide by their instructions.

To all of the Healthcare Workers: Thank You! You deserve our deepest gratitude for
your dedication, commitment and courageous sacrifices
to keep us safe during this crisis.

In 2018, Michigan voters passed a ballot initiative that allows for absentee voting without
explanation
, straight-ticket voting, same-day registration and automatic voter registration.
Use this voting process! This is the safest way to ensure that your vote will be registered during
this crisis.

Per the Secretary of State site, the polls are still expected to be open on election day,
May 5, 2020. The Bureau of Election’s will mail absent voter ballot applications to all
voters with postage-paid return envelopes unless those voters have already requested an
absent voter ballot. The state will include a cover letter that voting by mail is the optimal
way to cast a ballot dueto the public health crisis. The State will also assist in providing
all absentee voters with prepaid-postage to return their ballots.

There is still concern from retirees in reference to BCN Advantage benefits.
REMINDER: If you have questions about your BCN Advantage benefits, you
are invited to contact Keri Rust,
Insurance Benefits Analyst, @ 1-517-284-0085
or 1- 800-505-5011 and/or Kelsi Sawdy, BC/BS @ 1-517-325-4006

Please contact the Office of State Employer (OSE) with any changes
in your status, especially your current address. You may be missing
updates from ORS if your address is not correct. Whenever bulk mailings
are done from Local 6000, (Including: Newsbreak, election ballots or
other notifications) the address list from OSE is used. If your address is
not current you may be missing important notification. Call OSE with
any changes, so that you will not miss any future notifications.

GET INVOLVED!! JOIN THE UAW LOCAL 6000 RETIRED WORKERS CHAPTERS!!

 

RETIREE CORNER

March 24, 2020, Governor Whitmer signed the Executive order: “Stay Home – Stay Safe” that directs all non-critical businesses to temporarily close, and
all Michiganders to stay home or six feet away from others (
social distancing measures recommended by the CDC) for at least the next three weeks.

Sisters and Brothers, our world has changed with the arrival of Covid 19. We have entered into a very historical and life-changing moment, and we are all
feeling the effects of our new reality.
Our entire nation has shut down except for essential services. The coronavirus has triggered a down-turn in our
economy, unprecedented job losses of roughly 10 million to 15 million, 
causing severe hardship to families and negatively impacting our 401K’s. The virus
is causing overwhelming stress on our medical facilities. As of April 1, Michigan has recorded 7,615 cases and 259 deaths from the virus.

Based on current statistics, those at high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19 are people aged 65 years and older. It is extremely heart wrenching that the
coronavirus pandemic has disrupted our normal lives, but perhaps none is as cruel as the separation of seriously ill patients and their loved ones.

These next few weeks are going to be tough as we abide by the Governor’s orders! Social isolation can lead to feelings of loneliness. We are independent
souls, insisting on “taking care of ourselves”. We are social beings and need the interaction with our family and friends. But it is necessary for us to stay
home in order to protect everyone. As we go through this trying ordeal, the isolation could increase our anxiety and stress. Call daily, text, or communicate
on the internet with family and friends. Another choice is to use the time to do those projects that you just didn’t have time to complete, or start spring
cleaning! But, keep busy!

In an effort to keep seniors safe and ensure that they are able to get needed staples, some grocery stores have established 7:00 am – 8:00 am specifically
for seniors to shop. You might wish to take advantage of the delivery programs offered, as some stores deliver for free and others make charge up to $10.
Call your market to find out what is available.

If you experience a financial hardship and need assistance please call United Way 211 the helpline is available by phone, text or live chat 24 hours a day
to connect people with the resources they need in times of crisis. Other resources you might contact is your local Commission on Aging and various churches.

By now, you have received your 2020 Census forms. If you have not responded, please take this time to complete the forms. This year you can respond in
one of three ways: online, by phone, or by mail. When you respond to the census, you’ll tell the Census Bureau where you live as of April 1, 2020.

Responding to the census is not only your civic duty; it also affects the amount of funding your community receives, how your community plans for
the future, and your representation in government. Specifically, data from the 2020 Census provides the basis for distributing more than $675 billion i
n federal funds annually to communities across the country to support vital programs—impacting housing, education, transportation, employment,
health care, and public policy. They also are used to redraw the boundaries of congressional and state legislative districts and accurately determine the
number of congressional seats each state has in the U.S. House of Representatives.

REMINDER: If you have questions about your BCN Advantage benefits, you are invited to contact Keri Rust, Insurance Benefits Analyst,
@ 1-517-284-0085 or 1- 800-505-5011 and/or Kelsi Sawdy, BC/BS @ 1-517-325-4006

Please contact the Office of State Employer (OSE) with any changes in your status, especially your current address. You may be missing
updates from ORS if your address is not correct. Whenever bulk mailings are done from Local 6000, (Including: Newsbreak, election
ballots or other notifications) the address list from OSE is used. If your address is not current you may be missing important notification.
Call OSE with any changes, do not miss any future notifications.

GET INVOLVED!! JOIN THE UAW LOCAL 6000 RETIRED WORKERS CHAPTERS!!

                   

ATTENTION!!!
The March 19, 2020 meeting of the UAW Local Statewide Chapter Retired Workers meeting in Lansing because of the COVID-19 threat is canceled.

We urge you to follow the guidelines set by Michigan authorities.

 Center for Disease Control – Information on COVID-19

Early information about COVID-19 shows that some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from this illness. This includes:

  • Older adults
  • People who have serious chronic medical conditions like:
    • Heart disease
    • Diabetes
    • Lung disease

If you are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, you should:

Supplies to have on hand..

  • Contact your healthcare provider to ask about obtaining extra necessary medications to have on hand in case there is an outbreak of COVID-19 in your community and you need to stay home for a prolonged period of time.
  • If you cannot get extra medications, consider using mail-order for medications.
  • Be sure you have over-the-counter medicines and medical supplies (tissues, etc.) to treat fever and other symptoms. Most people will be able to recover from COVID-19 at home.
  • Have enough household items and groceries on hand so that you will be prepared to stay at home for a period of time. Remember, many grocery stores now deliver. Or, call family or friends to assist. Your county Commission on Aging is another resource.

Other advice:

  • Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others.
  • When you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick, limit close contact and wash your hands often.
  • Avoid crowds as much as possible.
  • Avoid cruise travel and non-essential air travel.
  • During a COVID-19 outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible to further reduce your risk of being exposed.

 

 

RETIREE CORNER

Hello Retirees:

March 17, Saint Patrick’s Day, is in honor of the Patron Saint of Ireland, the missionary who brought Christianity to the Irish people in the 400’s AD. The day has many symbols and traditions, from shamrocks and leprechauns, to green beer and Corned Beef and Cabbage. On this day, everyone is Irish!! Enjoy!!

National Pi Day is always March 14, and celebrates Pi, a mathematical concept and a number that never ends….at least no one and no computer has found the end yet. Often, we round it off to 3.14. National Pi Day is a celebration of mathematics. And, more specifically…. it celebrates “Pi”.

We were fortunate to have Keri Rust, Insurance Benefits Analyst, and Kelsi Sawdy, BC/BS as our guests at the February 20, Statewide Retired workers meeting in Lansing. They reviewed the BCN Advantage program and addressed members questions that have risen since the program became effective in January, 2020.

If you are requesting durable medical supplies, they are covered by Medicare before. You can use anyone in network to obtain the equipment. Medicare oversees Blue Cross to comply with all Medicare guidelines. If there are items that Medicare does not there is a possibility that your state benefits will. Never go to Medicare first

When using your Silver Sneakers card, it might be best if you check out various facilities. Some have more machines or additional classes such as cardio or other services that the card covers. You can enroll at more than one facility and take advantage of as many classes as you wish.

Both ORS and BC/BS have protocol for time allowed for an agent to respond to your call. You ay be put on hold for them to access information to get answers, but that time should be as brief as possible.

Insurance coverage will no longer begin with the fiscal year in October. The benefit year will always begin on January 1st each year. Enrollment will be in June.

If you are an active employee, when you turn 65, you will need to sign up for Medicare. Call OSE and advise them you have registered for Part A and B. This could be a give you a reduction on your current insurance without losing any of your current benefits.

If you have further questions, you are invited to contact Keri Rust, Insurance Benefits Analyst, @ 1-517-284-0085 or 1- 800-505-5011 and/or Kelsi Sawdy, BC/BS @ 1-517-325-4006

UAW REGION 1-D RETIRED WORKERS CONFERENCE

May 26 – 29, 2020 – The Walter and May Reuther UAW Family Education Center at Black Lake

You are eligible If you are a due’s paying member, dues paying surviving spouse or associate member of UAW Local 6000 Retired Workers Chapter or Sub Chapter in Region 1-D you are eligible to attend. There is limited number of spaces. Bus transportation will be available in the following areas:

Kalamazoo, South Haven, Holland, Grand Rapids

Muskegon, Whitehall, Hart, Ludington, Cadillac

Jackson, Lansing, Flint

Saginaw, Bay City, Roscommon

You are encouraged to ride the bus. If a bus is available in your area, No mileage will be paid if you decide to drive.

Please contact me asap csross43@aol.com if you are interested

Please contact the Office of State Employer (OSE) with any changes in your status, especially your current address. You may be missing updates from ORS if your address is not correct. Whenever bulk mailings are done from Local 6000, (Including: Newsbreak, election ballots or other notifications) the address list from OSE is used. If your address is not current you may be missing important notification. Call OSE with any changes, do not miss any future notifications.

You are invited to attend any or all of the UAW Local 6000 Chapter and Sub-Chapter Retired Worker meetings. The invitation also includes any or all of Region 1-D Regional Retired Worker meetings. Please bring a friend (or friends) and join us for our meetings!!

                 

Hello Retirees:

Welcome to a new decade, welcome to 2020!! This New Year stands before us, like a chapter in a book, waiting to be written. We can fill that book with the experiences, the changes we have seen in the past decades through this new one. Let’s all write a Pulitzer prize!

Belonging to the UAW Local 6000 Retired Workers Committee is about renewing old friendships with co-workers, becoming a family together, serving others in our communities, fighting for justice for all and having fun too.  We had a great opportunity to connect with other retirees at some fabulous get-togethers and parties during the holidays! Members contributed several toys for Toys for Tots, at the Statewide Retiree Christmas luncheon at Krzysiak’s in Bay City. The Saginaw sub-chapter collected toys and personal care items for the Mustard Seed Shelter in Saginaw. God Bless you all!

I hope everyone had the opportunity to attend one of the meetings on Medicare Advantage. Because there were so many questions, President Mitchell and myself sent a letter to ORS and Blue Cross requesting them to add additional meetings throughout the state, significantly in the UP and in the Detroit area. We will be requesting Blue Cross to attend a Retiree meeting February to again go over the information on the new programs and answer any questions you may have encountered.   Many retirees their Silver Sneakers cards last week.

The White House 2020 budget proposal calls for major reductions in spending on Social Security and Medicare. Social Security is an important source of retirement income as 3 in 5 beneficiaries aged 65 or older rely on it for at least half of their income. Benefits are an earned right as workers financed the program through a payroll tax. If benefits were cut or decreased, it would cause disaster to thousands of families. More than ever, everyone to vote! Stay informed and VOTE!

All eligible and registered voters in Michigan may now request an absent voter ballot without providing a reason. Absentee ballots became available January 25th for Michigan’s 2020 presidential primary. Per information on the Office of Secretary of State website (michigan.gov/sos), your request for an absent voter ballot must be in writing and can be submitted to your city or township clerk. You must be a registered voter to receive an absent voter ballot, but you can register and apply for an absent voter ballot at the same time.  If you received assistance voting the ballot, then the signature of the person who helped you must also be on the return envelope. Only you, a family member or person residing in your household, a mail carrier, or election official is authorized to deliver your signed absent voter ballot to your clerk’s office. You have until 8 p.m. on election day to complete the ballot and return it to the clerk’s office. Your ballot will not be counted unless your signature is on the return envelope and matches your signature on file. 

April 1, 2020 is Census Day! A census is taken every 10 years to get an accurate count of the nation’s population and demographics. Be sure that you and your family are counted. The information is used for a wide range of political and funding decisions, including how many seats states will have in the U.S. House of Representatives, funding for K-12 education, nutrition assistance, Head Start, elderly services and many other programs.  If you are interested, the U.S. Census Bureau is still recruiting to fill temporary positions in some areas to assist with the 2020 Census count.   Census takers will typically be employed for about six weeks, with the majority of the work occurring from April to July 2020. Average hourly pay ranges from approximately $12.00 – $25.00 per hour. This is the address to apply: http://recruitment.2020census.gov/client/census or 1-855-562-2020

 Please contact the Office of State Employer (OSE) with any changes in your status, especially your current address. Whenever bulk mailings are done from Local 6000, (Including: Newsbreak, election ballots or other notifications) the address list from OSE is used. If your address is not current you may be missing important notification. Call OSE with any changes, do not miss any future notifications. (517) 373-7400

 You are invited to attend any or all of the UAW Local 6000 Chapter and Sub-Chapter Retired Worker meetings. The invitation also includes any or all of Region 1-D Regional Retired Worker meetings. Please bring a friend (or friends) and join us for our meetings!!

GET INVOLVED!! JOIN THE UAW LOCAL 6000 RETIRED WORKERS CHAPTERS!!

UAW Retired Workers Monthly Meetings
UAW Local 6000, Statewide Retired Workers Chapter:
Third Thursday, @ 10:30 a.m. at UAW Local 6000, 3350 N Grand River Ave, Lansing, MI 48906.

 UAW Local 6000, Region 1-A Retired Workers Chapter:
1st Monday @ 10:30 am at Region 1-A, 9650 S. Telegraph Road, Taylor, MI  

 UAW Local 6000, Region 1-D Saginaw Retired Workers Sub Chapter: Will not meet in January, February and March, 2020